How You Can Help

Membership

Our mission is funded by member dues and contributions. To join us in our continuing effort to preserve our history and promote its understanding, please consider a membership or donation. The Society is a 501(c)(3) organization and your membership dues and donations are fully tax deductible. To join the Historical Society, you may join online and pay securely with a credit card using PayPal or mail the membership form with your check. Note: PayPal fees are included in the online prices.

Join or renew your membership:
Pay securely online
Send your check by mail 

Our newsletter, The Vintage Rabun Quarterly, is mailed to all members of the Society. The newsletter features articles by members, as well as Society news and updates. For upcoming events and announcements, click on the following link for our most recent Newsletter. The Vintage Rabun Quarterly

The Historical Society meets at the museum building on the third Thursday of every month at 5:30 p.m. with the exception of December. All members are invited to attend.

Gifts

If you have photographs, documents, or artifacts that are representative of Rabun County or Appalachian culture that you would like to share with us, we would be delighted. We can scan photographs and give them right back to you.

Volunteer

Volunteers are the heart of the Rabun County Historical Society. We need your help! If you would like to volunteer to staff the museum or help organize and catalog inventory, please contact us by phone at 706-782-5292 or email at history@rabunhistory.org. No specialized knowledge is required; we will find a job to suit your skills.

Help us plan for Rabun County’s Bicentennial Celebration in 2019

Special Exhibit:
Learning Curve:  100 Years of Rabun Education, 1875 to 1975

When Rabun County was created from Indian Territory in 1819, this part of southern Appalachia was the frontier, difficult to reach and with none of the niceties available in the cities of the Eastern Seaboard like organized schooling. Education was considered the responsibility of parents alone. From these inauspicious beginnings, education in Rabun County has progressed by leaps and bounds.

When Rabun County was created from Indian Territory in 1819, this part of southern Appalachia was the frontier, difficult to reach and with none of the niceties available in the cities of the Eastern Seaboard like organized schooling. Education was considered the responsibility of parents alone. From these inauspicious beginnings, education in Rabun County has progressed by leaps and bounds.
View this exhibit

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