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Discover Our Heritage
Welcome to the Rabun County Historical Society

Rabun County is located in Southern Appalachia and was part of the Cherokee Nation for thousands of years before the arrival of white settlers. The State of Georgia removed the Cherokees in 1819 and gave the land to settlers in a land lottery. Despite isolation brought on by high mountains and wild rivers, our scenic beauty has beckoned visitors since the mid-nineteenth century.

The mission of the Rabun County Historical Society is to preserve, collect, organize and disseminate information about Rabun County's past in order to further its understanding.

Please join us in working toward this goal. Become a member today or renew your membership.

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Our Mission

The Rabun County Historical Society has been established to:

  • Appraise, collect, organize, describe, preserve and make available the history of Rabun County, its environs and artifacts.
  • Provide facilities for the retention, preservation, servicing and research use of such records.
  • Serve as a research center for the study of Rabun County's history by members of the community and other interested persons.
  • Serve in a public relations capacity by promoting knowledge and understanding of Rabun County's origins.

Special Exhibit:
Learning Curve:  100 Years of Rabun Education, 1875 to 1975

When Rabun County was created from Indian Territory in 1819, this part of southern Appalachia was the frontier, difficult to reach and with none of the niceties available in the cities of the Eastern Seaboard like organized schooling. Education was considered the responsibility of parents alone. From these inauspicious beginnings, education in Rabun County has progressed by leaps and bounds.

When Rabun County was created from Indian Territory in 1819, this part of southern Appalachia was the frontier, difficult to reach and with none of the niceties available in the cities of the Eastern Seaboard like organized schooling. Education was considered the responsibility of parents alone. From these inauspicious beginnings, education in Rabun County has progressed by leaps and bounds.
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