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Support us in our continuing effort to promote and preserve our history. Fill out our membership application to join us today!

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Discover Our Heritage
Welcome to the Rabun County Historical Society

Rabun County is located in Southern Appalachia and was part of the Cherokee Nation for thousands of years before the arrival of white settlers. The State of Georgia removed the Cherokees in 1819 and gave the land to settlers in a land lottery. Despite isolation brought on by high mountains and wild rivers, our scenic beauty has beckoned visitors since the mid-nineteenth century.

The mission of the Rabun County Historical Society is to preserve, collect, organize and disseminate information about Rabun County's past in order to further its understanding.

Please join us in working toward this goal. Become a member today or renew your membership.

Photo Gallery

Browse our photo gallery organized by topic.

History Sketches: People of Note

  • Lizzie York Keason (1871-1960)

    Midwife Lizzie Keason of Tiger recalled in a 1955 interview when she was 84 years old that she had delivered 525 babies and assisted in the delivery of hundreds more. She called her talent a "God-given thing," never losing a mother or a baby in her entire career. 

    Read more...

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Our Mission

The Rabun County Historical Society has been established to:

  • Appraise, collect, organize, describe, preserve and make available the history of Rabun County, its environs and artifacts.
  • Provide facilities for the retention, preservation, servicing and research use of such records.
  • Serve as a research center for the study of Rabun County's history by members of the community and other interested persons.
  • Serve in a public relations capacity by promoting knowledge and understanding of Rabun County's origins.

Help us plan for
Rabun County’s Bicentennial Celebration

Special Exhibit:
Rabun’s Twentieth Century in Review

The Tallulah Falls Railroad arrived in Tallulah Falls in 1882 and tourism boomed in the town next to the gorge and the beautiful series of waterfalls. Many tourist groups posed under the rock formation called Witch's Head. Photo circa 1900

At the turn of the twentieth century, Rabun County remained largely isolated from the outside world. This would change dramatically with the coming of a railroad which also brought tourism, logging and dam building.
View this exhibit

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